Fermented Vegetables: Probiotics in a Jar

Have you attempted to solve the probiotic puzzle? It’s hard to know whether or not probotics are something that you need or just another fad.

The fact is, probiotics play a huge role in maintaining a high functioning immune system and something almost everyone could benefit from. There are some options when it comes to making sure you’re getting what you need.

Fermented Vegetables

Why Do We Need Probiotics?

Most of us don’t have enough ‘good’ bacteria (gut flora) in our intestinal track. Gut flora consists of trillions of complex microorganisms that assist in the digestion process and contribute to our overall health.

Ninety percent of our immune system lies in the healthy bacterium that resides in our gut. Our traditional American diet is full of things that destroy this gut flora.  Sugar, antibiotics – not only the ones that we take, but those found in meat and dairy products – and genetically modified grains are all good gut flora zappers.

Not having adequate amounts of good bacteria weakens our immune systems and puts us at risk for autoimmune diseases and irritable bowel syndrome, and increases our risk of succumbing to viral infections. New research is showing a link between abnormal gut flora and Autism, obsessive compulsive disorder, and ADHD. Although more work will needs to be done to prove these theories, the preliminary findings provide hope that there may be help for people that suffer from these afflictions.

Because these healthy flora are so critical to good health and our western lifestlye leaves them in short supply, supplemetation makes sense.

Supplementing: The Easy Way

If you want to increase the good bacteria in your system, the easiest way is to purchase a supplement from your local CVS or health food store.  You’ll find there are a wide range of probiotics on the market that contain various strains of bacteria that provide different functions.

I am not an expert on the various strains of bacteria so I did some research to find out what we should be looking for.  There is an excellent article on probiotic supplements at Lean It Up.com that you should check out before you make a purchase. But . . . . .

before you do that, keep reading for an even healthier way to boost immunities.

Supplementing: The Natural Way

There are ways to increase your gut flora without purchasing expensive supplements. A better and less expensive approach is to make probiotics in your own kitchen by fermenting fresh vegetables. It’s an easy process, and not only do you get the benefit of the healthy bacteria, you get all of the vitamins, minerals and fiber from eating the veggies.

The Process For Vegetable Fermentation

What you’ll need:

– One or two glass jars with plastic or glass lids (I used jars with the lids that latch.)
– Sea Salt (you can add more salt to taste)
– Filtered Water
– Fresh Vegetables of your choice

 *You don’t have to use cabbage but I read that it will help the fermentation process, so I put some chopped cabbage into each of my jars.

Directions:

– Dissolve one and a half tablespoons of sea salt in one quart of filtered water.
– Chop the vegetables you’re going to use and put them in the jar leaving a half an inch at the top.
– Add spices, peppercorns or other seasonings.
– Pour the salt water in the jar to cover the vegetables.
– Place a cabbage leaf on top of the vegetables and press it under the water so that all of the vegetables are submersed.
– Allow the filled jars to sit at room temperature for five to seven days.
– Open the lids of the jars once a day to release the gases (and taste the vegetables to see if they’re ready).
– Once the vegetables have fermented, move the jars to the fridge where they will keep for several weeks.

Vegetable fermentation takes anywhere between three to seven days depending on the temperature of the room.  You’ll know when the vegetables have fermented because they will have a sour (pickled) taste.  If any mold or scum forms on the top of the jar, simply skim it off.

Fermented vegetables contain several bacteria: Lactobacillus brevis, Lb. plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pediococcus acidilactici and Ped. Pentosauceus.

Kefir Is Another Option

Homemade kefir and  yogurts also provide an abundance of probiotics and the strains are different than the ones found in fermented veggies.  I wrote a how-to on making kefir awhile back that you can check out here: How To Make Your Own Kefir

Kefir

Most of us could beneift from a daily dose of probiotics and they are even more essential for people that have been taking antibiotics. Long term antibiotic use can result in a condition known as C.difficile which is life threatening inflammation of the colon.

Individuals with chronic conditions or that have active auto-immune disorders should consult with their doctor before supplementing with probiotics.

Are you boosting your immune system with probiotic supplements or fermented vegetables?

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