Archives for 2018

No Excuses Winter Cardio Jump Rope Workout

My last post discussed the best way to stay motivated to do training runs indoors on a treadmill this winter.

If you don’t have access to a treadmill, an inexpensive, portable jump rope that can be used almost anywhere might be the answer. Jumping rope is an excellent way to burn calories quickly, and it will help you increase – or maintain – your cardiovascular fitness when the weather doesn’t permit outdoor activities like running and biking.

Jump rope

Here’s the low down on the benefits from a jump rope workout:

You don’t have to spend an hour jumping a rope to reap the rewards. A 15 to 20 minute workout will burn off the calories found in a candy bar (not that we’re eating those) according to Web MD.

Jumping utilizes a number of different muscle groups, strengthening both the upper and lower body.

While there is some impact on the knees and hips, it is less stressful to the body than jogging.

You can do a quick jump rope workout almost anywhere. You do not need  gym membership or access to expensive fitness equipment to workout this winter.

Jump roping is second to none for building strong bones.

Jump rope workouts will improve your agility and hand-to-eye coordination and well as your balance.

Think Jumping Rope is Boring?

A jump rope workout doesn’t have to be boring. There are plenty of ways to add variety to this type of workout. As always, you can count on YouTube to provide a different jump rope workout for each day of the week.

A good one to start with is this 10 Minute Jump Rope Workout from Popsugar. Don’t worry if you mess up. You probably haven’t jumped rope for some time and it’s like everything else. It just takes a little practice to get back in the swing of it.

Purchasing The Best Jump Rope

When you go to purchase a jump rope make sure you get one that is the proper length for you. To determine the perfect length, stand on the center of the cord. The handle tips should reach your armpits. When you rotate the rope for the jump, the rope should brush the floor under your feet. If it doesn’t, the rope is too short.

There are different styles of ropes; beaded, speed, freestyle and cord. If you are purchasing your rope from a sporting goods store you can ask an employee to help you select the best rope. Check out Jumprope.com for more information about how to choose a rope. They have ropes for sale at this site as well.

No Excuses This Winter!

A jump rope workout is the perfect way to stay fit this winter. Keeping your jump rope handy eliminates one more excuse for not getting in a good cardio workout several times a week.

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Run for Time Not Distance If You’re Training Indoors This Winter

It was 12 below zero this morning when I got up to run. Obviously, hitting the ice-covered streets and sidewalks isn’t an option. So I got bundled up and headed to the Y where I found plenty of empty treadmills.

treadmills

It’s only 12 below. Where is everybody?

I can get motivated to do some rather serious training runs in the spring when I have events coming up that I want to be semi-competitive at. At this time of year I’m on a maintenance running program. The goal is to not lose everything that I’ve gained over the last year.

Should You Run for Time or Distance?

The time vs. miles debate is one you should research and consider if you’re doing treadmill running. If you’ve been running outside for the past seven or eight months, getting on the treadmill and setting the same mileage-to-time goal that you were doing outside is not only impossible, it’s de-motivating!

Experts will tell you to set a time goal and not worry about the miles. At least for now.

That’s what I did today and the outcome was better than it would have been if I would have been working on a distance goal.

Time Flies

Once you get warmed up and into the workout the time will start to go faster. Remember, the second half of the run always feel better than the first half does.

Jason Karp, Ph.D. says that time is more important than miles, especially if you’re training for longer runs. You will begin to see progress in both your distance and the time it takes you to cover it when you learn to stress your body for a certain length of time. If you’re training for a run that you think will take you an hour and a half to complete, run for an hour and a half. When the day of the event comes your body will be prepared for that duration.

Time vs distance

Plus, if your goal is to successfully run for one hour, regardless of the miles covered, when your watch says you’ve been running for 60 minutes you’ll have a feeling of accomplishment.

If you set a goal to run six miles in one hour and it takes you an hour and four minutes, you’ll focus on the failure of not meeting the miles-to-time goal. Chances are you will have trouble motivating yourself to try again.

Time Vs. Distance

I believe that establishing time rather than distance goals is the secret to success for indoor winter training.

When you move back outside in the spring you can begin to incorporate realistic miles-to-time goals and add tempo runs and speed drills so you’ll be fully ready to kick butt at any event you sign up for.

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Just getting started on your running journey? We all started in the same place. Here’s my story as I went from running a 5K to a half marathon. My Running Success Story.